Fentanyl Addiction Treatment & Rehab

Fentanyl rehab provides safe, compassionate treatment for those struggling with extremely dangerous fentanyl addiction. Treatment options are generally geared around individual needs and may include medication maintenance programs or withdrawal blocking agents to minimize symptoms and help you focus on deep healing. If you or someone you love is addicted to fentanyl, contact SJRP admissions at 833-397-3422 to learn more about our Fentanyl rehab program and the next steps to establishing healthy recovery from this devastating disease.

Fentanyl Addiction Treatment Options

Like many other types of opioids, fentanyl has high addiction potential, for even its medical users. As such, the U.S. has taken measures to try and regulate the substance’s use, and addiction centers in Florida have worked to incorporate fentanyl into their recovery programs and plans. Fentanyl addiction treatment looks just like other types of opioid substance abuse treatment. And fentanyl treatment facilities operate in much the same ways as other substance abuse centers. If you or you loved one is looking for fentanyl treatment options, here are the broad types of programs that can be available to you:

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Fentanyl Addiction Treatment Medications

Medication can be used in two ways in fentanyl treatment:

  1. In medication assisted withdrawal and detox.
  2. In long-term medication-assisted treatment (MAT).

Like other types of opioids and abused substances, fentanyl can onset a wide variety of side effects, even when you stop using it. These symptoms–known as withdrawal symptoms–are largely very uncomfortable (and at times, life-threatening), and if not treated with care, can be onsetting factors for a fentanyl relapse.

Upon making note of these dangers associated with opioid withdrawal, research laboratories and facilities found that there are certain types of medications that can work to suppress the effects of withdrawal symptoms, help clients manage their cravings, and overall make withdrawal, detox, and recovery a little easier to work through. Although there are many different types of medications that can be used in fentanyl addiction treatment, the more commonly employed medicines include:

Residential Rehab

Inpatient and residential treatment facilities can be either long-term or short-term intensive care options for you, or your loved ones, to look into if you are considering substance abuse recovery programs. These types of programs are located across the country, typically considered more effective for long-term recovery, and normally last for either 30-day or 90-day periods. With residential or inpatient rehab programs, clients must remain on facility grounds 24/7 for the duration of their treatment. This way the program allows for not only intensive medical care, but emergency care, detox, and 24 hour assistance for all recovery needs, including mental and emotional counselling and therapy.

Typically residential rehab or inpatient rehab follows medical detox and withdrawal, lasts about a month, and then helps clients transition into an intensive outpatient, or outpatient program. The program’s lengths for residential rehab, as well as the opportunities and therapies a client may experience, can be altered to fit the specific needs of the individual though. Remember, one sign of a good addiction recovery program is their willingness and ability to work with you, be flexible, and meet your needs to help you meet your recovery goals. Typically, you can expect residential and inpatient rehab facilities to offer these types of program opportunities:

Intensive Outpatient and Outpatient Rehab

Intensive outpatient rehab and outpatient rehab operate on the same principles as residential and inpatient rehab. The goal for each of these programs is to help you heal from addiction, both physically and mentally, in as holistic a manner as possible. Typically, intensive outpatient and outpatient facilities are the same as inpatient rehab. They provide largely the same types of therapies, counsellings and treatment opportunities, but are generally a little more flexible than residential rehab, especially since you don’t have to live on facility grounds while undergoing treatment.

Generally, intensive outpatient and outpatient programs allow you to live at home, or in a sober living apartment, work, go to school, and then commute to grounds for sessions a few times a week. Outpatient programs typically require you to engage in anywhere from 9 to 30 hours of session and group meetings a week, depending on you and your personal needs. Essentially, intensive outpatient and outpatient programs allow for clients to still receive hands-on treatment for substance abuse rehab, while reintroducing them into normal living society. It can be the best of both worlds, but is typically referred for those who have completed inpatient rehab, or have less extensive substance abuse issues.

Dual Diagnosis

Dual diagnosis treatment can be rather complicated, especially as the definition of the term can lead to confusion. Typically, a dual diagnosis means that a client suffers from both a mental health disorder, and a separately occurring alcohol or drug issue. A dual diagnosis can also mean that a client suffers from not only a severe mental health issue, but also a few different substance abuse problems, including use of a variety of substances, or addiction to a variety of substances. Treating dual diagnosis clients can be rather difficult and tricky at times. It often requires many hospitalizations and / or longer inpatient rehab programs to be employed, in order to support the patient’s health.

Why? Because even though some individuals may think it is easier to work on one problem at a time when it comes to treatment, dual diagnosis clients usually have their symptoms and issues intertwined, meaning they need to be treated slowly for all of their issues at once, to ensure proper care, and the safest, most holistic treatment as possible. Recovering from a dual diagnosis can take a very long time, but it is not impossible.

How Long Does Fentanyl Rehab Take?

It depends. Every individual going through substance abuse rehab for recovery is different. They have different struggles, different bodies, personalities, mindsets, families, health issues, and so on. Thus, treatment and fentanyl rehab can take as short or long a time as the individual needs. Sometimes treatment for recovery is a lifelong pursuit. And that is 100% okay. Recovery programs themselves can last anywhere from 30 to 90 days or longer, dependent on the individual. The bottom line is fentanyl rehab and recovery time looks different for everyone, and that sometimes it can take a long time, and that is perfectly okay.

How Much Does Fentanyl Addiction Rehab Cost?

Again, the cost of fentanyl addiction rehab depends. Rehab costs can be influenced by state, by type of treatment, length of treatment, and the facility grounds themselves. Remember, a fancier more luxurious facility does not mean a better treatment program. You want your facility to be clean of course, but don’t get stuck on the look of the grounds, or their guarantees of 100% successes in treatment. These types of facilities are normally just trying to get your money, and are not concerned with your healing.

On the other hand, most substance abuse facilities (that are not over the top) care deeply about you, your health, and integrating you back into society as a happy, healthy, and productive citizen. As such, they will work with you as much as they can to help you pay for your individual treatment needs. There are grants for treatment, scholarships, some states have treatment funds, and most treatment programs have different payment methods you can look into as well. The bottom line here is that these facilities want to see you heal, and that your healing saves you (and the nation) a lot of money in the long run.

Does Insurance Cover Fentanyl Rehab?

Yes. Fentanyl rehab centers are typically very flexible with payment methods. You can enroll in a payment plan, get a grant, be funded by state or research groups, or even have your insurance help cover the cost of your treatment. Now, you’ll have to do some digging into your individual insurance policy and what services they may or may not cover, but typically, your insurance company will help to cover some of the cost of your treatment, as it pertains to your overall health.

Choosing a Fentanyl Rehab Center

Choosing a fentanyl rehab center can seem like an overwhelming task, but at the end of the day, its rather simple. You simply need to pick the right rehab center for you. But don’t be afraid to choose a program plan and find that it wasn’t the best fit for you after all, recovery is not a race, and you can always try a different program. Just remember that above all your treatment center should want to work with you, for you, to meet your individual recovery goals and needs, and that sometimes it is best to go further away from home to help break old habits and establish a new life-style.

There are many inpatient rehab centers across the country, but they are not all created equal. Remember, never equate luxury with quality when it comes to an addiction treatment program. A fancy bed and pretty exterior will not help you recover from your substance addiction. And again, remember that your recovery will not look like someone else’s, and that is perfectly okay. Take it one day at a time.

Our Fentanyl Addiction Treatment Center

Here at St John’s Recovery Place, our main focus is you. We want to see you succeed on your road to recovery, to support you during your biggest struggles, and to love you through it all. At SJRP people, living healthy, happy, balanced lives is our goal. We provide access to not only withdrawal and detox treatment facilities, but we also offer a multitude of different treatment programs and plans for you to try. At SJRP our addiction treatment programs provide you with the opportunity to attempt new things, learn new skills, rebuild relationships, and learn how to build a healthier, happier, more thriving lifestyle. All you need to do is call admissions at 833-397-3422 today, and speak with a representative about what your next steps should be to start your recovery journey with us.

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